Use Wooden Bird Feeder Plans To Get the Look You Want

It has been too many years to count now, the morning I went outside looked around and said to myself, wow am I blessed.  I have a gorgeous yard with flowers, flowering trees, and beautiful oaks.  What is missing I

Three absolutely gorgeous, decorative bird feeders, with intricate exterior work

Extra Fancy WOW Bird Feeders

thought, and then I realized there were few or no birds in my yard.  It was then I went to work to change all of that when I decided that I would build my very first wooden bird feeder.  That’s just what I did right after I bought a set of bird feeder plans.

It was one of those times in my life when I wanted something ornate and decorative and nothing less would do.  While the ones above I did not make, the one I did make that season looked very much like the one on the far right.  Yes, I put my heart and soul into the outside of the house, but it was worth it.

Hi Everyone, it’s me Rose with an update for you.  Recently, I found a household woodworking project dream.

We all know that only the best of plans tell you what tools you’ll need, never mind how to use them.  At our house, we’ve had more woodworking projects than just me building bird feeders, and we are ever so glad we now have this series of 10 eBook guides entitled, “How To Build Anything With Three Tools”.  Each of these 10 books sells for $4.95 apiece, but they are available now at a terrifically reduced price when you get the whole series.  The whole series is virtually only half of what you’d spend on each book separately to the set.

Together, these little woodworking bibles cover the three tools you must have, how to use those to make the guides which allow you to saw with absolute precision.  There is even a separate book which explains which kind of wood you should purchase for each type project.  These ten eBooks will give anyone the confidence to begin woodworking projects.

We’ve all been there staring at pictures or sketches on a plan sheet which contains no helpful information on how to proceed.  It’s like having your dad or your grandpa there to help you when you have this information handy on your work bench.  My grandfather was a carpenter and used to build beautiful bookcases for my grandmother, so when I saw these books, I was thrilled.  Take a peek at “How To Build Anything With Three Tools”.

On a more practical note however, regardless of how pretty your new wooden bird feeder is, in order for it to attract birds and fulfill its promise you must follow these guidelines:

Eye Appeal

There is an old saying among architects that goes something like, “it costs the same amount to build ugly, so why build ugly?”  The same goes for your bird feeders.  Make sure your new bird feeder has eye appeal for everyone including the birds.  After all, it will be looked at since bird watching is why you are building it.  Besides, it is an extension of your home.

It bears repeating that to use bona fide bird feeder plans will ensure your project ends in an attractive way regardless your woodworking skill set.  These plans are not only step-by-step instructions, but are also guides as to the tools and materials you will need.

Proper Placement

The feeder should be placed in the best possible area for the birds to come.  Take these factors into consideration when planning where you will put it.

First, the birds have to notice it and the feed and it will have to be in a location in which the birds feel safe.  There is no reason the bird feeder shouldn’t be a focal point in your yard, so proudly display your new feeder.

Sense of Security

Place the feeder well off the ground so it is well out of reach from dogs and kitty cats.  Birds are afraid of these animals and will not frequent a frightening bird feeder.

In addition, it is important to keep insects out of the bird feed, so be sure to build it in such a way that the birdseed is protected from the weather and well ventilated to keep it dry.  Remember to check your feed periodically to make sure the seed is edible and fresh.

Finally, when you are building your little masterpiece paint as much as you

Decoriative little cedar tray bird feeder with a roof

A cute little wood worker's delight of a small tray feeder with a roof and made of cedar to keep the insects away from the feed.

like on the outside, but leave the interior exposures to the birds and the feed unpainted.  Also, used untreated wood too.  These two little steps will help to ensure your birds are not harmed by any chemicals in the paint or in treated wood.

I’ve been writing on bird watching and building your own birdhouses and bird feeders from plans  for some time now and wouldn’t build without them.  The  two links which follow are a valuable resource for many of my

readers.  With just under one hundred to choose from, these two highly skilled draftsmen have put together the best collections of bird feeder plans on the market today.  In addition, for a low price they both include literally thousands of additional woodworking plans for various projects around the house.

Thanks for reading and drop me a line…..  Rose

Birds Can Fall Ill From Using Poorly Designed and Filthy Bird Feeders

Just like people, birds can fall prey to illness. Many times these diseases come from other birds, which may have fed at the same time or just before other birds came to a feeder. Little did you or did the birds know  they

Excerpt from Hopper Bird Feeder Plans showing hopper, the roof like cover or lid, and the feeding area around the bottom of the hopper

Hopper Bird Feeder Designs Showing Roof Like Cover and Feeding Area

would leave your feeder on the way to sickness or even death. We can’t prevent sickness in birds anymore than we can stop it in ourselves, but we can certainly take precautionary measures to protect our bird visitors. As with humans, cleanliness is the first and biggest step toward being healthy, so regular cleaning of the feeder is very important. Another way your birds can fall ill is when they eat spoiled food. Usually, moisture from dew or rain is the cause for bird feed to spoil. The moisture can cause the uneaten food to become damp, which can lead to fungus and mold as well as to the general decay of the feed due to micro-organisms. In earlier posts, we’ve touched on, but haven’t thoroughly covered this critical issue, so we’ll take this opportunity to discuss the pros and cons of certain feeders and what you can do to keep them as healthy as possible for the birds you love.

There are certain features in the bird feeder plans you use that are critical to your birds’ health too, so let’s get started on learning the best practices for keeping your birds healthy. Platform or Tray feeders are easy to use for setting out virtually any kind of food out for your birds, but are the one design most open to the weather and to other animals and the waste they might leave while feeding on left over bird food. Not that birds don’t leave bird waste, they certainly do.

Platform and Tray feeders have the birds walking all over the food and leaving droppings in the process. As such, this type feeder needs cleaning daily and you should try to match the amount of food placed each morning with what the birds consume each day. Then, perform this daily cleaning at the end of every day in order to keep the other animals away at night. Make a diluted bleach solution to actually wipe the feeding area down about once every two or three months, and more often if it is rainy during the summers where you live.

Tube Feeders and Hopper Feeders should be checked periodically in the tube and the hopper for clumps of bird seed that has become moist and stuck together. This clumps of seed should be removed. Always try to check these types of feeders after a rain storm or rainy spell of weather.

Upside Down Suet Feeder with Roof Like Covering Over a Hardware Cloth Protected Suet Cake

Upside Down Suet Feeder With Roof Like Cover and Hardware Cloth Protected Suet Cake

Bird Feeder Plans should be chosen which have covers in the form of a roof over the hopper and which extends out over the feeding area around the hopper bottom. After any stormy weather the seed should be checked for moisture in the both the hopper and around the openings on the tube. These feeders should be cleaned periodically especially the area around the bottom of the hopper and any small areas where the birds can pull seed out of the tube while feeding.

If you are using a suet feeder, it is recommended you use bird feeder plans which have a design which protects the suet area under a roof like cover. See previous articles for the upside down suet feeder and the suet feeder built like a little house with a roof, and a tray around the caged suet area. During the winter, tending to these feeders is mainly an effort to keep the feeder supplied, but in the summer suet feeders need regular attention to make sure birds don’t feed on rancid suet or suet cakes. This is especially true in the south where the summers can be quite hot. A good rule for summer and suet feeders is to place them in shade in order to keep them as cool as possible.